Neuropsychology in forensic mental health practice: two-day conference, March 19-20 2019

Tuesday-Wednesday, March 19-20 2019, conference

Zehmer Hall, Auditorium, University of Virginia, Charlottesville

Forensic Training Series

This two-day conference focuses on issues of neuropsychology in forensic mental health practice.  Please see detailed agenda and educational objectives below.

Date: Tuesday-Wednesday March 19-20 2019  two-day program 

Time: 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM Tuesday; 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM Wednesday. Lunch on your own.  If you like please bring a box or bag lunch to enjoy at our venue.  A UVA dining room is walkable from our venue: UVA's Observatory Hill Dining Hall [ https://virginia.campusdish.com/en/LocationsAndMenus/ObservatoryHillDiningRoom ]

Location: Auditorium of Zehmer Hall, UVA Continuing and Professional Studies. 104 Midmont Lane, Charlottesville 22904.    Find a map and directions for Zehmer Hall: Map and Directions to Zehmer Hall

There is no charge to you for parking but parking is LIMITED.  PLEASE help accommodate all participants  by ride sharing and carpooling.  

Lodging: If you are interested to know about local lodging please inquire with els2e@virginia.edu.  

Faculty for this program:  In alphabetical order

Beth Arredondo PhD, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans LA

Scott Bender PhD, ILPPP, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville VA

Joette James PhD, Neuropsychologist, metropolitan Washington DC

Bernice Marcopulos PhD, Graduate Psychology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg VA

Daniel Murrie PhD, ILPPP, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville VA

Chriscelyn Tussey PsyD, New York University and Metropolitan Forensic and Neuropsychological Consultation, PLLC, New York City NY

Proposed Agenda and Educational objectives:

Day One, March 19

8:30 AM: Registration open.  Arrive to enjoy AM refreshments and to be settled by 9:30 AM.

9:30 AM

Welcome

Introduction to the conference theme and both days’ content

Introductions of the conference faculty

Introduction to Day One

Daniel Murrie PhD

9:45 AM – 12:30 PM

 Overview of Neuropsychology in the Forensic Setting

Brief description and educational objectives:

This session covers the utility of neuropsychology in forensic work, with a focus on the criminal setting and overview of civil relevance.

The morning will cover foundations, relevant case law, and cognitive deficits in common diagnoses.

Foundations of Clinical Neuropsychology in Forensic Settings

  • The participant will be able to discuss foundational concepts regarding neuropsychology in criminal and civil forensic settings.

Relevant Case Law and Guidelines

  • The participant will be able to identify relevant case law, practice guidelines, and ethical considerations regarding the use of neuropsychology in the criminal forensic setting.

Cognitive Deficits in Common Diagnoses

  • The participant will be able to describe cognitive deficits associated with common diagnoses in forensic settings and how those deficits may impact forensic competencies.
  • The participant will be able to evaluate limitations of knowledge and comfort in assessing cognitive deficits in forensic contexts.
  • The participant will be able to list some steps to apply what they have learned knowledge to current practice. 

Beth Arredondo PhD

Chriscelyn Tussey PsyD

AM Break will be offered by faculty

12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch (on your own)

Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to enjoy at Zehmer Hall.  Other lunch options include driving out or walking to Observatory Hill Dining Hall of the University.

1:45 – 4:30PM

Cognitive impairment 

Brief description and educational objectives:

This session continues coverage of the utility of neuropsychology in forensic work, including additional coverage of morning topics, as needed. The afternoon will also focus on assessment of impairment, practical considerations, cultural factors, and the relevance of neuropsychological assessment in capital cases.

Assessment of Cognitive Impairment

  • The participant will be able to identify several  commonly used cognitive assessment instruments in forensic neuropsychological evaluations.
  • The participant will be able to appraise the impact  of culture and language on assessment of cognitive functioning which threatens the validity of assessment.

Practical Considerations

  • The participant will be able to describe techniques used to assess cognitive deficits or disorders in practical situations of forensic evaluation work.
  • The participant will be able to give examples of incorporating neuropsychological information in report writing and testimony.

Capital Cases

  • The participant will be able to summarize the important contributions of neuropsychological assessment in capital cases.
  • The participant will be able to summarize the limitations of neuropsychological assessment in capital cases and give examples of ethical dilemmas.

Bernice Marcopulos PhD

with

Beth Arredondo PhD

Chriscelyn Tussey PsyD

Afternoon break will be offered by faculty

5:00PM

Adjourn


Day Two, March 20

8:30 AM: Arrive to enjoy AM refreshments and to be settled by 9:00 AM.

9:00 AM

Welcome

Introduction to Day Two

Daniel Murrie PhD

9:10 AM – 12:00 PM

Neuropsychological approaches to assessing effort, response bias, and malingering

Brief description and educational objectives:

Neuropsychologists have well-developed assessment approaches to assess response validity.  This session reviews these broader approaches, along with specific tests, and addresses common issues in contested cases.

  • The participant will be able describe some recent research in malingering detection.
  • The participant will be able to identify some best practices  in malingering detections. .
  • The participant will be able to discuss postconcussive syndrome (PCS), its confounds, and its rapid growth within neuropsychology.

Scott Bender PhD 

Morning break will be offered by faculty

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch (on your own)

Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to enjoy at Zehmer Hall.  Other lunch options include driving out or walking to Observatory Hill Dining Hall of the University.

1:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Neuropsychological  issues specific  to juveniles and young adults

Brief description and educational objectives:

Recent Supreme Court decisions emphasize the importance of developmental immaturity—and incomplete brain development—in juvenile sentencing.  This session provides a neuropsychological perspective on juvenile brain development, and emphasizes issues that clinicians should consider in evaluations of juveniles and young adults. 

  • The participant will be able to describe the major neurological changes that occur during the adolescent period.
  • The participant will be able to discuss the relationship between brain development and adolescent emotional, social, and behavioral functioning, with exposure to key research findings in this area.
  • The participant will be able to describe recent key Supreme Court decisions as they relate to the sentencing of juveniles.
  • The participant will be able to discuss the nature and purpose of neuropsychological evaluations in the context of juvenile sentencing.

Joette James PhD 

Afternoon break will be offered by faculty

3:30 PM

Concluding comments, questions and responses, and

Faculty and Participants

Complete evaluation forms and return to ILPPP staff table

Adjournment – 4:00PM/4:30PM

 


Disclosures:

The following speaker(s) with this program have no personal or professional financial relationships with a commercial entity producing healthcare goods and/or services: (in alphabetical order) :

TBA

The planning committee have no personal or professional financial relationships with a commercial entity producing healthcare goods and/or services (in alphabetical order): Daniel Murrie PhD, Michael Schaefer PhD, Benjamin Skowysz LCSW, Janet Warren DSW

Accreditation and Designation Statements:

For physicians and others

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of Virginia School of Medicine and Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy. The University of Virginia School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Virginia School of Medicine and/or The University of Virginia School of Nursing Continuing Education, as accredited provider(s),  awards 12 hours of participation (consistent with the  designated number of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM  or ANCC contact hours) to participants who successfully completes this educational activity. The University of Virginia School of Medicine and/or The University of Virginia School of Nursing Continuing Education maintains a record of participation for six (6) years.

The program is jointly provided by the Office of Continuing Medical Education of the the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy at the University of Virginia.

The cost will be $18 for each hour of credits claimed out of the 12 total available.

For psychologists and others

The Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The cost will be $10 per hour ($10 x 12 hours=$120).


Continuing education

For complete information regarding continuing education please  

email els2e@virginia.edu  Thank you. 

How to register for the program:

Application for registration is made through your individual user profile created with the ILPPP website. Please create your profile, or get automated help to find your profile if you have forgotten your profile name or password: http://ilppp.virginia.edu/OREM/Registrant/SignIn
After you apply for registration you will receive an automated email confirming that ILPPP has received your application. Acceptance into a program is not automatic because capacity limitations and public mental health system needs are considered. After ILPPP formally accepts a registrant  into the program they will receive a second automated email that confirms registration and includes invoice information and online payment instructions.
Before the program ILPPP will send further information to assist participant's planning. Questions about registration may go to els2e@virginia.edu 
Registration & Cancellation Fees and Refund Policy

Fees:

Employees of VA DBHDS facilities and CSBs - $175

Others - $395

Please inquire at els2e@virginia.edu about a 'group discount' for two or more from your agency, office,  facility, school or work setting ($175/per registrant).

Cancellation fee - $25.00.

A full registration fee refund will be processed only if the registrant has submitted the cancellation notice to ILPPP no later than 7 days prior to the first day of the program. If registration is cancelled 6 days or less days prior there is a $25 cancellation service charge which will be deducted from the program’s registration fee. The remainder of the registration fee will be processed within 10 days following the end of the training program. Please allow 30 days following the end of the training program to receive the refund. Refunds will be processed according to the method of original payment (check, credit card or EDI-transfer).